*1 November* Dia de los Muertos, by La Casa de Barro

Posted on November 16, 2018


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Dia de los Muertos

 

Goleb & La Casa de Barro would love to invite you to “Dia de Muertos” an event that happens only once a year. It is a tradition that comes from immemorial times, the celebration of what is present but invisible to our eyes and also a reason to make Chilate together (traditional drink).

Dia de Muertos is a day celebrated by different cultures from Central America. On the 1st and 2nd of November, it is believed that the beloved ones who have left this world can come back to us and together celebrate a day of reunion with their beloved.

This is the day where food, drinks, and music revive the presence of our beloved ones in us. This is the day to reinforce the ancestral presence in ourselves and nourish the knowledge we have inherited. This is the day of remembrance for the past weaved in between the present.

Due to the nature of the presentations and the cost we need to keep this event small. We will reserve your place only with a confirmation of your assistance.

As “diablitos” we are willing to share with you a little bit of what we are, what we think, what we love, nourished by work, struggle, and pain. And in the same way, we want to hear from you by contributing to production costs. This will make it possible for us to share more future events. For this please bring a cup of sugar with you. There will be also a donation box in the space.

Date: Thursday 1st Nov.
Time: 19:00-22:00
Venue: Goleb Burgemeester de Vlugtlaan 125, 1063 BJ, Amsterdam
Organized and hosted by La Casa de Barro

Looking forward to drink Chilate with you.
Sincerely,
Los diablitos

Reservations required, please send us an email to reserve at
rawvegandinners.lacasadebarro@gmail.com

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Who Moves and Who Doesn’t? (2018)
(duration 20 minutes)
by Pitchaya Ngamcharoen

Not so often we get to trace another person by smell these days, but each individual leaves traces. On a small scale, we leave footsteps where we walk pass, breadcrumbs on the table where we had a sandwich, hairs that fell on the floor, trace of heat left on windows after we touch them or a smell of food that lingers in the kitchen after we cook. If we consider smell as a trace of existence, we can maybe slowly try to understand lines of habitation.

“For the Inuit, as soon as a person moves he becomes a line. To hunt for an animal, or to find another human being who may be lost, you lay one line of tracks through the expanse, looking for signs of another line that might lead you to your quarry. Thus the entire country is perceived as a mesh of interweaving lines rather than a continuous surface.”2

Trace of gestures, the person is his or her movements. Trace of existence, line of smell. When lines of smells are weaved together, they create a fabric of habitation.

To wash myself with cleaning products is to reduce my body odor to the point where it’s socially acceptable. To wash our clothes is, as well, to erase the evidence that that particular cloth has been worn. Alain Corbin mentions in The Foul and The Fragrant that there is a strong relationship between absence of odor and the surveillance of behavior pattern.3 To abolish traces of existence, such as smells, is to erase part of our history – to deny our existence. But some traces have more tendency to be erased than others. Deodorization has become a sign of healthy and clean, however, there is no neutral smell. Deodorization is the way of replacing smell that is presumed “bad” with a “fresh” or “clean” smell. But which smells get to stay in place and which one is selected to be removed?

2Lines; A Brief History, Tim Ingold, p. 75
3 Corbin, Alain, 1986. The Foul and the Fragrant: Odour and the French Social Imagination, p. 95

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Lecture performance about Ayotzinapa
(20 minutes)
By Aldo Esparza Ramos

The act of remembrance of a deceased through a personal object functions as a metaphor for the soil where from the narratives of that life have germinated.

During this lecture-performance, the audience gets to know indigenous students through their personal clothes and experiences, which together function as a cultural portrait. The lecture performance aims to bring a deeper understanding of who these people are.

The heart of this project is to guard and to amplify the memories of diversity of those who have become the oppressed, the dehumanized and the dispensable. At the moment when we transport the story into our daily life through a vivid memory that story becomes our own. As the griot4 guards the collective memory of the ancestral.

The healing is enabled in the manifestation of the silent wounds by sensibilizing oneself to the silent reality present in the space between the voice and the objects, between the body and the presence and between listening and feeling. In order to open oneself up to the wounds and testimonies of the destroyed families.

Wishing to share this celebratory event with you all.
Kindest Regards

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